Founded in 1999 by filmmakers Tracey Robertson and Nathan Mayfield, Hoodlum is an Emmy® and BAFTA Award-winning production company. 

WeirAnderson.com invested in Hoodlum in 2012, with Deanne Weir becoming Chair that same year.

Tracey, Nathan and Deanne all share a passion for great storytelling.

Hoodlum has been a pioneer in multiplatform production. It creates original television, immersive digital campaigns and multiplatform content for some of the world’s leading broadcasters and brands.

Hoodlum is the production company behind the 10 part series Tidelands: Netflix’s first original TV series for Australia.

Fresh on its slate is the 10 part series Harrow, with ABC Australia and ABC Studios International (being ABCSI’s first scripted drama outside of the USA). And Hoodlum’s first feature film produced in Australia was Australia Day (2017).

The company has offices in both Brisbane and Los Angeles.

Visit the Hoodlum website

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 Members of the Hoodlum team (front from left): Founder and Chief Creative Officer, Nathan Mayfield; Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Tracey Robertson; Head of Television, Leigh McGrath.

Members of the Hoodlum team (front from left): Founder and Chief Creative Officer, Nathan Mayfield; Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Tracey Robertson; Head of Television, Leigh McGrath.

 On location filming Secrets & Lies

On location filming Secrets & Lies

News:  Review for Australia Day 

The Australian
September 23, 2017

David Stratton, Film Critic

Run Lola Run meets Gran Torino in Kriv Stenders’s breathtakingly fast-moving Australia Day, a very well-made thriller set in Brisbane one January 26. These are not the only movies ­referenced in Stephen M. Irwin’s screenplay, which appears to be modelled after films such as Crash, in which several different stories taking place simultaneously intersect and connect. It’s a good device for combining what is basically a series of short stories.

Most of the characters in the film are on the run. Teenager Lan Chang (Jenny Wu) has been forced into prostitution but has managed to escape­ from the brothel where she’s been held prisoner. Her pimp is pursuing her, but she’s helped by Terry Friedman (Bryan Brown), a cattle farmer who is driving around the suburban­ streets apparently aimlessly, though we eventually discover that he has a grim mission­ in mind.

WATCH: The trailer for Australia Day

Meanwhile, April Tucker (Miah Madden) is also on the run; she and her sister were involved in a police chase that ended in a fatal crash in which the sister was killed; April is searching for her mother, a drug addict, while Sonya Mac­kenzie (Shari Sebbens), an indigenous police office­r involved in the fatal pursuit, is desperately trying to locate the girl.

And there’s Chloe (Isabelle Cornish), in love with Sami (Elias Anton), an Iranian youth. Chloe’s brother, Dean (Sean Keenan), and his loutish friends, the sort who drape themselves in the Australian flag and bash Muslims, want revenge on the man they think raped Chloe, even though the relationship was consensual.

This, then, is the “lucky country’’ celebrating its national day with brutality and violence, but Stenders doesn’t dwell too much on the social and political themes in the film. This is primarily a thriller, and a very effective one. The pacing­ is extremely brisk so there’s little time to ask awkward questions about some aspect­s of the plotting and the characters.

An excellent ensemble cast brings the charac­ters vividly to life, with Brown’s rugged Terry especially outstanding.

Other major pluses of the film are the photo­graphy of Geoffrey Hall, who skilfully uses Steadicam to keep up with the action, and the crisp editing of Nick Meyers.